crisheart
oregonrighttolife:



This photo was taken at the University of Minnesota by photographer Robert Wolfe in 1972. It was taken during surgery for an ectopic pregnancy. No one can deny the humanity of the unborn even in these early stages.A doctor who was present for the surgery later shared this testimony:“Years ago, while giving an anesthetic for a ruptured ectopic pregnancy (at 2 months), I was handed what I believe was the smallest living human ever seen. The embryo sac was intact and transparent. Within the sac was a tiny human male swimming extremely vigorously in the amniotic fluid, while attached to the wall by the umbilical cord. This tiny human was perfectly developed, with long, tapering fingers, feet and toes. It was almost transparent, as regards the skin, and the delicate arteries and veins were prominent to the ends of the fingers. The baby was extremely alive and did not look at all like the photos and drawings of ‘embryos’ which I have seen. When the sac was opened, the tiny human immediately lost its life and took on the appearance of what is accepted as the appearance of an embryo at this stage, blunt extremities, etc.” —Paul E. Rockwell, M.D.

oregonrighttolife:

This photo was taken at the University of Minnesota by photographer Robert Wolfe in 1972. It was taken during surgery for an ectopic pregnancy. No one can deny the humanity of the unborn even in these early stages.

A doctor who was present for the surgery later shared this testimony:

“Years ago, while giving an anesthetic for a ruptured ectopic pregnancy (at 2 months), I was handed what I believe was the smallest living human ever seen. The embryo sac was intact and transparent. Within the sac was a tiny human male swimming extremely vigorously in the amniotic fluid, while attached to the wall by the umbilical cord. This tiny human was perfectly developed, with long, tapering fingers, feet and toes. It was almost transparent, as regards the skin, and the delicate arteries and veins were prominent to the ends of the fingers. The baby was extremely alive and did not look at all like the photos and drawings of ‘embryos’ which I have seen. When the sac was opened, the tiny human immediately lost its life and took on the appearance of what is accepted as the appearance of an embryo at this stage, blunt extremities, etc.” 

—Paul E. Rockwell, M.D.
crisheart
'This is what I've come to believe about change: it's good, in the way that childbirth is good, and heartbreak is good, and failure is good. By that I mean that it's incredibly painful, exponentially more so if you fight it, and also that it has the potential to open you up, to open life up, to deliver you right into the palm of God's hand, which is where you wanted to be all long, except that you were too busy pushing and pulling your life into exactly what you thought it should be. 'I've learned the hard way that change is one of God's greatest gifts, and most useful tools. Change can push us, pull us, rebuke and remake us. It can show us who we've become, in the worst ways, and also in the best ways. I've learned that it's not something to run away from, as though we could, and that in many cases, change is a function of God's graciousness, not life's cruelty.'
Shauna Niequist  (via ktmeek)
crisheart
There’s not enough wrong with the church to leave, but there’s just enough wrong with it to stay and fight to change it. In the end, despite how much I love my church, I’m not an idealist. Every human community will disappoint us regardless of how well-intentioned or inclusive it is. But I am, however, totally idealistic about God’s redeeming work in my life and in the world. This community will disappoint you—it is a matter of when, not if. Either we will let you down or I will say something stupid and hurt your feelings. I invite new members on this side of inevitable disappointment to decide whether they’ll stick around after it happens. If they choose to leave when we don’t meet their expectations, they won’t get to see how the grace of God comes in and fills the holes left by our community’s failure and that’s just to real and too beautiful to miss.
Nadia Bolz-Weber (via yesdarlingido)